Control cross-contamination through lab vacuum lines

It’s worth remembering that the vacuum lines in the central vacuum system serving your lab are sucking gases and vapors and maybe bio-aerosols into a common conduit. Once there, they mix with the emissions from other vacuum applications. As long as they stay in the vacuum lines, they will cause you little problem (except for…

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Operating an energy-efficient laboratory

In this post, we’ll outline a few of the most important strategies to consider when operating an energy efficient laboratory. New construction Architects who pay careful attention to building design will be able to significantly limit heat gains and losses. Leveraging technology like exterior shading, high-reflectivity window films, low energy lighting and insulated door and…

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Vacuum technology for flexible lab spaces

Looking closely at some of today’s older lab buildings can give you a hint of the design philosophy when they were constructed. Labs in many older buildings consist of confined, small – sometimes windowless – spaces in which a lone researcher or two would toil away. Work was performed insularly, and technology changed only slowly,…

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Which type of vacuum pump is best for my lab applications?

When choosing a vacuum pump for their laboratory, many people find vacuum technology a bit confusing. Rather than wrestle with the details of vacuum pump specifications and how they relate to the application at hand, the temptation may be to choose the pump they had before (even though it may reflect aging technology), look for…

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Where central lab vacuum systems fall short – Sustainability

The traditional approach to providing vacuum for science labs was a central vacuum system. Also known as “house vacuum,” these systems used one or more large pumps to send vacuum through copper tubing throughout the building from their location in a basement. The large central pumps typically operate 24/7, ensuring that vacuum will be available…

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Where central lab vacuum systems fall short – Renovations

Traditional lab building vacuum systems – commonly called house vacuum or central vacuum systems – rely on one or more large pumps in the basement to send vacuum through a network of large diameter copper or stainless tubing throughout the building to the labs. Because house vacuum systems are built into the infrastructure of their…

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Where central lab vacuum systems fall short: multidisciplinary science buildings

Teaching and research buildings increasingly combine scientific disciplines to encourage collaborative, problem-focused learning and discovery. While some labs in such buildings may benefit from a central vacuum system, others require more capable vacuum – or none at all. For example, chemists often need relatively deep, stable or electronically controlled vacuum, which a central system cannot…

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The Challenges of Supplying Vacuum for a Cleanroom

In certain industries, successful research, product development or manufacturing depends on the maintenance of a contaminant-free environment. Work on pharmaceuticals, medical devices and electronics, for example, may be compromised by particulates or airborne microbes. To protect these critical processes, cleanrooms are used to control airflows to achieve extremely low particulate loads. Operating the equipment needed…

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Effective vacuum control for your lab – Part 2

In our last blog entry, we reviewed the challenges presented by using uncontrolled vacuum in the lab, and took a look at manual options for vacuum control. In this note, we’ll examine options for electronic vacuum control. Electronic vacuum control requires both detection and a control technique. The detection is provided by an integral vacuum…

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